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GARNET

The word garnet comes from the 14th‑century Middle English word gernet, meaning 'dark red'. It is derived from the Latin granatus,from granum ('grain, seed'). This is possibly a reference to mela granatum or even pomum granatum ('pomegranate', Punica granatum), a plant whose fruits contain abundant and vivid red seed covers (arils), which are similar in shape, size, and color to some garnet crystals.

PEARL

pearl is a hard object produced within the soft tissue (specifically the mantle) of a living shelled mollusk or another animal, such as a conulariid. Just like the shell of a mollusk, a pearl is composed of calcium carbonate (mainly aragonite or a mixture of aragonite and calcite)

WHITE MOONSTONE

The most common moonstone is of the mineral adularia, named for an early mining site near Mt. Adular in Switzerland, now the town of St. Gotthard. The plagioclase feldsparoligoclase also produces moonstone specimens. Moonstone is feldspar with a pearly and opalescent schiller.

CITRINE (SUNHELA)

Citrine /ˈsɪtriːn/ is a colour, the most common reference for which is certain coloured varieties of quartz which are a medium deep shade of golden yellow. Citrine has been summarized at various times as yellow, greenish-yellow, brownish yellow or orange

Amethyst

Amethyst is a violet variety of quartz often used in jewelry. The name comes from the ancient Greek  a- ("not") and  ("intoxicated"), a reference to the belief that the stone protected its owner from drunkenness. The ancient Greeks wore amethyst and made drinking vessels decorated with it in the belief that it would prevent intoxication. It is one of several forms of quartz. Amethyst is a semiprecious stone and is the traditional birthstone for February.

VESOVIANITE (PERIDOT)

Olivine, of which peridot is a type, is a common mineral in mafic and ultramafic rocks, and it is often found in lavas and in peridotitexenoliths of the mantle, which lavas carry to the surface; but gem quality peridot occurs in only a fraction of these settings. Peridots can also be found in meteorites.

GOMED (IMPORTED)

Hessonite or Gomed is generally not worn based on the sign of zodiac of a person. Those who actively participate in politics are recommended to use Gomed. Furthermore, those who are occupied by the Rahu planet in the tenth house of natal chart are also suggested to wear Gomed. Numerous curative properties are also related with Gomed or Hessonite.

CAT'S EYE (QUARTZ)

Ordinary chrysoberyl is yellowish-green and transparent to translucent. When the mineral exhibits good pale green to yellow color and is transparent, then it is used as a gemstone. 

INDIAN RUBY

ruby is a pink to blood-red colored gemstone, a variety of the mineral corundum (aluminium oxide). Other varieties of gem-quality corundum are called sapphires. Ruby is one of the traditional cardinal gems, together with amethyst, sapphire, emerald, and diamond.

WHITE CORAL

In common with other Alcyonacea, White coral have the shape of small leafless bushes and grow up to a meter in height. Their valuable skeleton is composed of intermeshed spicules of hard calcium carbonate, colored in shades of red by carotenoid pigments.

TURQUOISE (FIROZA)

Turquoise is an opaque, blue-to-green mineral that is a hydrated phosphate of copper and aluminium, with the chemical formulaCuAl6(PO4)4(OH)8·4H2O. It is rare and valuable in finer grades and has been prized as a gemstone and ornamental stone for thousands of years owing to its unique hue. In recent times, turquoise has been devalued, like most other opaque gems,

BLUE TOPAZ

Pure topaz is colorless and transparent but is usually tinted by impurities; typical topaz is wine red, yellow, pale gray, reddish-orange, or blue brown. It can also be white, pale green, blue, gold, pink (rare), reddish-yellow or opaque to transparent/translucent.

WHITE TOPAZ/AQUA MARINE

Topaz is a silicate mineral of aluminium and fluorine with the chemical formula Al2SiO4(F,OH)2. Topaz crystallizes in the orthorhombicsystem, and its crystals are mostly prismatic terminated by pyramidal and other faces. 

NILI (IOLITE)

The name iolite is derived from Greek io meaning violet flower. It is also known as cordierite, dichroite, water sapphire, and lynx sapphire. These names are derived from the French mineralogist, Cordier; from its multi-coloring (wrongly) dichroitic; and from its similarity to sapphire.

PERIDOT (IMPORTED)

Peridot is one of the few gemstones that occur in only one color: an olive-green. The intensity and tint of the green, however, depends on the percentage of iron that is contained in the crystal structure, so the color of individual peridot gems can vary from yellow, to olive, to brownish-green. 

GOMED (IMPORTED)

Gomed, also known as Hessonite or Cinnamon Stone, is a gemstone which is generally used in India to fight the adverse effects of Rahu, a concept which is unique to Indian astrology. It is also believed to possess properties to relieve mental tension and improve strained relationships.

BLUE MOONSTONE

Moonstone has been used in jewelry for millenia, including ancient civilizations. The Romans admired moonstone, as they believed it was born from solidified rays of the moon. Both the Romans and Greeks associated Moonstone with their lunar deities.

OPAL

Opal is a hydrated amorphous form of silica (SiO2·nH2O); its water content may range from 3 to 21% by weight, but is usually between 6 and 10%. Because of its amorphous character, it is classed as a mineraloid, unlike crystalline forms of silica, which are classed as minerals. It is deposited at a relatively low temperature and may occur in the fissures of almost any kind of rock, being most commonly found with limonite, sandstone, rhyolite, marl, and basalt. Opal is the national gemstone of Australia.

RED CORAL (CAPSULES)

Red corals grow on rocky seabottom with low sedimentation, typically in dark environments—either in the depths or in dark caverns or crevices. The original species, C. rubrum (formerly Gorgonia nobilis), is found mainly in the Mediterranean Sea. 

RED CORAL (TRINGAL & OVAL)

Precious coral or red coral is the common name given to Corallium rubrum and several related species of marine coral. The distinguishing characteristic of precious corals is their durable and intensely colored red or pink skeleton, which is used for making jewellery.

RUBY (New Burma)

ruby is a pink to blood-red colored gemstone, a variety of the mineral corundum  aluminium oxide Other varieties of gem-quality corundum are called sapphires. Ruby is one of the traditional cardinal gems, together with amethyst, sapphire, emerald, and diamond They word ruby comes from ruber, Latin for red. The color of a ruby is due to the element chromium.

REAL ZERCON (WHITE/BLUE)

Zircon is ubiquitous in the crust of Earth. It occurs as a common accessory mineral in igneous rocks (as primary crystallization products), in metamorphic rocks and as detrital grains in sedimentary rocks.Large zircon crystals are rare. Their average size in granite rocks is about 0.1–0.3 mm, but they can also grow to sizes of several centimeters, especially in mafic pegmatites and carbonatites

EMERALD

merald is a gemstone and a variety of the mineral beryl (Be3Al2(SiO3)6) colored green by trace amounts of chromium and sometimes vanadium. Beryl has a hardness of 7.5–8 on the Mohs scale. Most emeralds are highly included,Emer so their toughness (resistance to breakage) is classified as generally poor. Emerald is a cyclosilicate.

YELLOW & BLUE SAPPHIRE (BANGKOK)

Sapphire is a gemstone, a variety of the mineral corundum, an aluminium oxide.Blue sapphires with up to 15% violet or purple are generally said to be of fine quality.

YELLOW & BLUE SAPPHIRE (CEYLON)

Sapphire is a gemstone, a variety of the mineral corundum, an aluminium oxide (α-Al2O3). It is typically blue in color, but natural "fancy" sapphires also occur in yellow, purple, orange, and green colors; "parti sapphires" show two or more colors.

CAT'S EYE (CHRYSOBERYL)

The mineral or gemstone chrysoberyl is an aluminate of beryllium with the formula BeAl2O4. The name chrysoberyl is derived from the Greek words χρυσός chrysos and βήρυλλος beryllos, meaning "a gold-white spar". Despite the similarity of their names, chrysoberyl and beryl are two completely different gemstones, although they both contain beryllium.

DIAMOND

Diamond ( /ˈdaɪəmənd/ or /ˈdaɪmənd/) is a metastable allotrope of carbon, where the carbon atoms are arranged in a variation of the face-centered cubic crystal structure called a diamond lattice. Diamond is less stable than graphite, but the conversion rate from diamond to graphite is negligible at standard conditions.